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Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Out For A Walk

Here I am out for a walk on the farm. My SLR is hanging from my shoulder. It has a very sensitive shutter release. This camera also has a very complex 36.3 megapixel full-frame, Sony-built, CMOS sensor. I always keep at least one my cameras set to capture images at the fastest rate possible. This is how an image seeker walks ready to capture a scene.

I hear the camera taking a picture. Apparently the release is bumping against my back. This is first image the camera took by itself:

Out For A Walk 17023654


This is the second shot the Nikon D810 captured:

Out For A Walk 17023653

The camera is spinning at the end of the camera strap. For some reason certain objects are slightly visible. My jeans are visible, why they are seen intact, while the camera is spinning, makes no sense.

These rare instances are among the images I treasure. My clients have no use for them. As a connoisseur of Impressionist art, I find them intriguing almost beguiling.

Miyazaki Japanese Garden 00058

I’ll readily admit, back in my digital darkroom, I slightly bumped up the color saturation for each of these images. I have a personal limit of 17% saturation maximum, so that’s how this image was adjusted. Two of my neighbors were professional photographers when I was a boy. They taught me how to compose images, and also the importance of good developing and printing skills. I had my own black & white darkroom at age 13. 

My photography career is about capturing images of businesses, people and their processes. Assembly lines, large gatherings, and especially how a business is conducted, those are my subjects. I assemble these images and standard operating procedures (SOP) into finely-detailed business process guides. Surprisingly, many new firms don't even have a clear set of SOPs all in one document. Older firms have very old SOP documentation. I update those to the latest procedures, and add detailed photographs.

My clients and myself use these documents to train employees. The photographs and documentation are also used to sell corporations and property.

I've photographed everything from manufacturing plants to airlines and breweries to concerts, festivals and political rallies, always photographing for management. This involves taking hundreds, if not thousands of images. It also involves all kinds of negotiations because employees don't always like having their picture taken at work.

Captures of computer screens, diagrams and charts must also be woven into the story of any organization. Finally, portraits of the employees, managers and owners are essential to make it all real. Annual meetings are a common recurring assignment for me.

You don't and won't see any of these photographs here, because they are covered by various non-disclosure agreements. The precise details of how a business operates are held very closely. 


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